Scylla Blog

Stay up to date with recent news and updates on our Users Blog, and get under the hood on our Developers Blog.

Jan17

Scylla’s Compaction Strategies Series: Space Amplification in Size-Tiered Compaction

compaction

This is the first post in a series of four about the different compaction strategies available in Scylla. The series will look at the good and the bad properties of each compaction strategy, and how to choose the best compaction strategy for your workload. This first post will focus on Scylla’s default compaction strategy, size-tiered compaction strategy.

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Jan4

Seastar: The future<> is Here

This is a cross-post from https://www.alexgallego.org/concurrency/smf/2017/12/16/future.html. On June 8, 2016, Avi Kivity came to NYC to present ScyllaDB. During his search for a quick open desk to do some work, I volunteered open spaces we had at Concord1. We talked lock-free algorithms, memory reclamation techniques, threading models, Concord and distributed streaming engines, even C vs C++. Five hours later I was convinced that Seastar was the best systems framework I’d ever come across.

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Dec28

How to Ruin Your Performance by Choosing the Wrong Compaction Strategy

compaction

Before organizations go into production with Scylla, they must ensure that they are getting the best possible performance so their applications and services will run optimally. One of the many ways to optimize your Scylla deployment is to choose the right compaction strategy. One of the more popular talks at Scylla Summit 2017 was on this subject. Based on that talk, I will explain what compaction is and then explore the different strategies available in Scylla.

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Dec13

Stop Wasting Scylla’s CPU Time by Not Being Prepared

What’s the deal with prepared statements? A query itself is just a string of text. For example: INSERT INTO tb (key,val) VALUES (“key”, “value”) In this simple example, we inserted two strings in a two-column table. Before that can happen, the CQL statement string (INSERT INTO…) needs to be sent to Scylla, parsed, and assuming no errors in the query, executed. It’s the parsing part that we are concerned with here. Parsing a CQL query is a compute-intensive operation that consumes resources just like anything else you would have a computer do. What if we could do the parsing part […]

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Dec7

If You Care About Performance, Employ User Defined Types

udt

What is a User Defined Type? (UDT)? User Defined Types (UDTs) allow a definition of struct that includes multiple typed named fields (including other UDTs). Once a UDT is defined, it can be used as a column type in a table definition. In Scylla, you can define a Column as a frozen<UDT>.

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Nov3

Scalable, Distributed Secondary Indexing in Scylla

The data model in Scylla and Apache Cassandra partitions data between cluster nodes using a partition key, which is defined by the database schema. Using a partition key provides an efficient way to look up rows using the partition key because you can find the node that owns the row by hashing the partition key. Unfortunately, this also means that finding a row using a non-partition key requires a full table scan which is inefficient. Secondary Indexes are a mechanism in Apache Cassandra that allows efficient searches on non-partition keys by creating an index.

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Oct5

Different I/O Access Methods for Linux, What We Chose for Scylla, and Why

When most server application developers think of I/O, they consider network I/O since most resources these days are accessed over the network: databases, object storage, and other microservices. The developer of a database, however, also has to consider file I/O. This article describes the available choices and their tradeoffs and why Scylla chose asynchronous direct I/O (AIO/DIO) as its access method.

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Sep21

Heat Weighted Load Balancing

Scylla 2.0’s New Feature in-depth: Heat Weighted Load Balancing With time, a Scylla cluster adapts to an application’s behavior. Given a steady read-mostly workload, after an initial warm-up period, all nodes will have their caches populated with a working set, and the workload will see a certain cache hit rate and enjoy a certain performance level (throughput and latency).

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Sep18

Scylla 2.0: Improved Latencies from 3.6ms to 0.8ms for the 99th Percentile

For a long time, permanent storage has been the bottleneck in most computer systems. Scylla operates under that assumption and includes a fully-featured userspace disk I/O Scheduler that is used to guarantee that different tasks in the database get their fair share of the disk. The I/O Scheduler is the central component at the heart of Scylla’s workload conditioning promise: to automatically adjust the database’s distribution of requests to adapt to the incoming workload. It is capable of providing Quality-of-Service (QoS) among the various tasks in the database and isolating them from each other. Since database systems tend to be […]

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Aug10

Meet Scylla Developer Raphael Carvalho

Raphael S. Carvalho is a computer programmer here at ScyllaDB who loves open source software and kernel programming. He worked on the Syslinux project to bring new file system support and also worked on MultiFS to allow multiple file systems to co-exist. For his Scylla work, he has been mostly working on SSTable compaction handling and recently developed the support for the Time Window Compaction Strategy on Scylla. This strategy is a considerably better alternative to the DateTieredCompactionStrategy. Raphael has a passion for making products and solutions better with his programming experience. You can learn more about Raphael in his […]

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